TransNamib fires manager

TransNamib fires manager

THE TransNamib Board has dismissed the para­statal’s General Manager of Human Resources, Jason Hamunyela, who had been on suspension for a year.

Foibe Namene, Chairperson of the Board, confirmed to The Namibian yesterday that a disciplinary hearing last month found Hamunyela guilty on most of the charges and that the Chairperson, Elize Angula, had proposed on Wednesday that he be dismissed with immediate effect. “The Board confirmed the dismissal and gave instructions to the Chief Executive Officer (John Shaetonhodi) to carry them out,” she said from her farm, where she is on holiday.Namene said Hamunyela got off the hook on two charges and that the Board had given instructions that follow-up investigations be done into the involvement of other staff members in his deals.He had the option to appeal against the dismissal, she added.It was not clear yesterday whether Hamunyela would take that route.He was suspended with full pay in November last year to allow a smooth investigation.The suspension followed a report presented to the TransNamib Board by the Office of the Ombudsman.The report, subsequently included in the report of the Office of the Ombudsman to the National Assembly, said Hamunyela made huge overpayments to a security company in which he had interests.It said further that company “policies or procedures were not observed by mainly a senior manager (Hamunyela)”.”This manager’s unprofessional conduct caused staff members to become disloyal and disheartened,” the Ombudsman’s report said.He was also accused and found guilty of granting a tender to a security company he had interests in and inflating the figures after the tender was granted.In December 2004, The Namibian revealed details surrounding the appointment of a string of people close to Hamunyela and Shaetonhodi.Among them was Cletius Sipapela, who was appointed as Security Chief and promoted to Security Superintendent exactly a month later.He was fired last year after he was accused of influencing the company to give a security contract to a company in which he had shares – the same charge for which Hamunyela was dismissed.Hamunyela was using company property to conduct private consultancy work and also raised his own salary by 43 per cent.His invoices for around N$22 000 to the Roads Contractor Company for consultancy work were attached to the series of letters and documents distributed through e-mail to staff members at the company.Hamunyela did a survey for the RCC on the Chief Executive Officer’s salary package.In another case, Hamunyela conducted a disciplinary hearing for the Namibia Tourism Board on behalf of Preferred Labour Solutions (PLS) and used his work computer to bill them.A PLS document found on Hamunyela’s computer indicated that he had “a strategic working relationship” with the company.According to the documents, Hamunyela increased his own salary from N$226 260 a year to N$324 240 in June 2004 – an increase of N$97 980 or 43,3 per cent.”The Board confirmed the dismissal and gave instructions to the Chief Executive Officer (John Shaetonhodi) to carry them out,” she said from her farm, where she is on holiday.Namene said Hamunyela got off the hook on two charges and that the Board had given instructions that follow-up investigations be done into the involvement of other staff members in his deals.He had the option to appeal against the dismissal, she added.It was not clear yesterday whether Hamunyela would take that route.He was suspended with full pay in November last year to allow a smooth investigation.The suspension followed a report presented to the TransNamib Board by the Office of the Ombudsman.The report, subsequently included in the report of the Office of the Ombudsman to the National Assembly, said Hamunyela made huge overpayments to a security company in which he had interests.It said further that company “policies or procedures were not observed by mainly a senior manager (Hamunyela)”.”This manager’s unprofessional conduct caused staff members to become disloyal and disheartened,” the Ombudsman’s report said. He was also accused and found guilty of granting a tender to a security company he had interests in and inflating the figures after the tender was granted.In December 2004, The Namibian revealed details surrounding the appointment of a string of people close to Hamunyela and Shaetonhodi.Among them was Cletius Sipapela, who was appointed as Security Chief and promoted to Security Superintendent exactly a month later.He was fired last year after he was accused of influencing the company to give a security contract to a company in which he had shares – the same charge for which Hamunyela was dismissed.Hamunyela was using company property to conduct private consultancy work and also raised his own salary by 43 per cent.His invoices for around N$22 000 to the Roads Contractor Company for consultancy work were attached to the series of letters and documents distributed through e-mail to staff members at the company.Hamunyela did a survey for the RCC on the Chief Executive Officer’s salary package.In another case, Hamunyela conducted a disciplinary hearing for the Namibia Tourism Board on behalf of Preferred Labour Solutions (PLS) and used his work computer to bill them.A PLS document found on Hamunyela’s computer indicated that he had “a strategic working relationship” with the company.According to the documents, Hamunyela increased his own salary from N$226 260 a year to N$324 240 in June 2004 – an increase of N$97 980 or 43,3 per cent.

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