Sponsors give NFA ultimatum

Sponsors give NFA ultimatum

THE Namibia Football Association (NFA) faces a financial black-out after the Namibia Football Consortium yesterday expressed concern regarding the stalemate in the leadership of the mother body at the weekend.

The NFA executive committee, under the leadership of Acting Vice President John Muinjo, was hijacked by 12 affiliate regions who ruled that an interim committee be established after agreeing to put in a vote of no confidence for MuinjoŽs committee. The Namibia Football Consortium (NFC), which consists of three local companies and serves as the largest financial contributor to football in the country, threatened to pull the plug on the NFA if the leadership crisis is not resolved soon.In a media release yesterday, the Consortium, which consists of Mobile Telecommunications Limited (MTC), First National Bank (FNB) and Namibia Breweries Limited (NBL), demanded a formal debriefing on the leadership crisis in the ranks of the NFA.The three companies, which have committed themselves to invest N$8 million in football annually over five years, threatened to institute a moratorium to further investment in the game.The NFC has committed itself to invest N$40 million over five years.This is the largest ever investment in the game, which was financially troubled before the consortium came on board in 2001.It further demanded that the NFA host and Extra Ordinary Congress before the end of June with the aim of resolving the present leadership debacle.”The NFC will honour all obligations that are due to the NFA for the present season as mutually agreed, but that further payments are contingent upon a speedy resolution of the leadership crisis,” the statement said.The NFC says that it wants a professional attitude to be adopted by all parties to the conflict to find an amicable solution.MTC are the largest contributors with 50 percent, while the other two companies contribute 25 percent each.The leadership crisis was promoted by the refusal of the former leadership to grant the 12 members an opportunity to call for an Extra Ordinary Congress after they uncovered numerous irregularities that were not previously made public.The interim committee, headed by Blue Waters owner Hendrik Dawids, said it wanted the Extra Ordinary Congress to discuss the current problems in Namibian football.MuinjoŽs executive committee refused to grant the regions the opportunity to hold an Extra Ordinary Congress, despite the formation of a legible quorum in accordance with the NFA constitution.But after being told about their outstanding affiliation fees, the regions went ahead with the Congress at the weekend and elected the new members.Dawids is deputised by the current MTC Namibia Premier League (NPL) chairperson, Anton van Wyk, while several chairpersons from the affiliates also serve on the new committee.Sources claim that the main reason for the go-ahead of the Congress was based on apparent tribalism at Soccer House, while reports of incompetence among certain officials also emerged.The Namibian Sport has established that affiliates led by Dawids want him in office as president, with van Wyk earmarked for the vice presidency.Muinjo took over in an acting capacity about three months ago after long-serving Judge Petrus Damaseb called it quits due to pressing work commitments.When Muinjo came in, he immediately abolished the NFA Organising and Competitions Committee (OCC), which ran all football activities such as cup competitions and general developments of the game from Soccer House.Muinjo, his new men and one woman instead decided to give powers to regions to organise major tournaments such as the MTC NFA Cup and others whenever they go to their respective regions, while they were also given powers to control gate fees.The demotion of Eric Hansen, who was serving as the central figure on the OCC, also angered some of the members in the camp of Dawids, who argues that Muinjo was streamlining the Association to accommodate his own people.Muinjo, who served the NFA for more than 10 years in an acting capacity and then as president, is said to be looking for competent and professional people.But this has been met with resistance from the camp of Dawids and van Wyk, who initially mobilised the regions to put in a vote of no confidence for Muinjo’s leadership.Dawids yesterday said they would identify a date to hold an Ordinary Congress that will see the battle for presidency wide open between himself and Muinjo.There are no candidates for the hot seat apart from the two, who earlier indicated that they would be available to stand.The ousted leadership has not made an official statement on what to do next.The Namibia Football Consortium (NFC), which consists of three local companies and serves as the largest financial contributor to football in the country, threatened to pull the plug on the NFA if the leadership crisis is not resolved soon.In a media release yesterday, the Consortium, which consists of Mobile Telecommunications Limited (MTC), First National Bank (FNB) and Namibia Breweries Limited (NBL), demanded a formal debriefing on the leadership crisis in the ranks of the NFA.The three companies, which have committed themselves to invest N$8 million in football annually over five years, threatened to institute a moratorium to further investment in the game.The NFC has committed itself to invest N$40 million over five years.This is the largest ever investment in the game, which was financially troubled before the consortium came on board in 2001.It further demanded that the NFA host and Extra Ordinary Congress before the end of June with the aim of resolving the present leadership debacle.”The NFC will honour all obligations that are due to the NFA for the present season as mutually agreed, but that further payments are contingent upon a speedy resolution of the leadership crisis,” the statement said.The NFC says that it wants a professional attitude to be adopted by all parties to the conflict to find an amicable solution.MTC are the largest contributors with 50 percent, while the other two companies contribute 25 percent each.The leadership crisis was promoted by the refusal of the former leadership to grant the 12 members an opportunity to call for an Extra Ordinary Congress after they uncovered numerous irregularities that were not previously made public.The interim committee, headed by Blue Waters owner Hendrik Dawids, said it wanted the Extra Ordinary Congress to discuss the current problems in Namibian football.MuinjoŽs executive committee refused to grant the regions the opportunity to hold an Extra Ordinary Congress, despite the formation of a legible quorum in accordance with the NFA constitution.But after being told about their outstanding affiliation fees, the regions went ahead with the Congress at the weekend and elected the new members.Dawids is deputised by the current MTC Namibia Premier League (NPL) chairperson, Anton van Wyk, while several chairpersons from the affiliates also serve on the new committee.Sources claim that the main reason for the go-ahead of the Congress was based on apparent tribalism at Soccer House, while reports of incompetence among certain officials also emerged.The Namibian Sport has established that affiliates led by Dawids want him in office as president, with van Wyk earmarked for the vice presidency.Muinjo took over in an acting capacity about three months ago after long-serving Judge Petrus Damaseb called it quits due to pressing work commitments.When Muinjo came in, he immediately abolished the NFA Organising and Competitions Committee (OCC), which ran all football activities such as cup competitions and general developments of the game from Soccer House.Muinjo, his new men and one woman instead decided to give powers to regions to organise major tournaments such as the MTC NFA Cup and others whenever they go to their respective regions, while they were also given powers to control gate fees.The demotion of Eric Hansen, who was serving as the central figure on the OCC, also angered some of the members in the camp of Dawids, who argues that Muinjo was streamlining the Association to accommodate his own people.Muinjo, who served the NFA for more than 10 years in an acting capacity and then as president, is said to be looking for competent and professional people.But this has been met with resistance from the camp of Dawids and van Wyk, who initially mobilised the regions to put in a vote of no confidence for Muinjo’s leadership.Dawids yesterday said they would identify a date to hold an Ordinary Congress that will see the battle for presidency wide open between himself and Muinjo.There are no candidates for the hot seat apart from the two, who earlier indicated that they would be available to stand.The ousted leadership has not made an official statement on what to do next.

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