Food reaches remote Kaoko school

Food reaches remote Kaoko school

FOOD deliveries to some 6 000 children in the Kunene Region who have been without food since schools opened in January are expected to start today.

The Ministry of Education started trucking food to the central warehouse in Opuwo yesterday. Lourens Kamati, a departmental head at the Kaoko-Otavi Primary School, which serves as cluster day-hostel for six other small schools in the area, said he was notified by head office in Windhoek that supplies were to be delivered yesterday.”We just got a call from the school feeding people in Windhoek… they said food was going to be sent up by truck to Opuwo, and once there was enough stock in the warehouse, they would start distributing,” Kamati said in a telephonic interview from Kaoko-Otavi.Last week, Kamati had contacted the Namibian Broadcasting Corporation’s call-in radio programme, the Chat Show, to bring the plight of the children to the attention of the authorities and the public.In a vast and under-populated area suffering endemic poverty, Kaoko-Otavi is perhaps one of the most dependent schools as far as school feeding is concerned.Kamati said the teachers at the school and other schools in the area have been buying maize for the schoolchildren from local shops out of their own pockets.The Kaoko-Otavi day hostel, which houses and feeds children who live too far away to walk to school every day, houses 220 children at the moment, teachers at the school said.Some 6 000 children, who depend on the school feeding scheme for a regular meal during the week when they attend schools far away from their homes, have been left without any stocks.Teachers in the area complained that this was a regular occurrence at the beginning and end of every term, and that complaints to Windhoek appeared to fall on deaf ears.Several members of the public have offered food and cash after hearing of the shortage.Because of the remoteness of the area, Kamati has suggested that people wishing to make donations should deposit money into the account of the chairperson of the Kaoko-Otavi school board, Hilma Kauaria.Kauaria has made her account with First National Bank in Opuwo available for this purpose (Savings Account 605 4416 8227).”If people can help us, we can get other food than the protein blend.We know that we will get maize, but we do not know about the other stuff… but we can buy better food, if the people of Namibia can help us,” Kamati said.* John Grobler is a freelance journalist; 081 240 1587Lourens Kamati, a departmental head at the Kaoko-Otavi Primary School, which serves as cluster day-hostel for six other small schools in the area, said he was notified by head office in Windhoek that supplies were to be delivered yesterday.”We just got a call from the school feeding people in Windhoek… they said food was going to be sent up by truck to Opuwo, and once there was enough stock in the warehouse, they would start distributing,” Kamati said in a telephonic interview from Kaoko-Otavi.Last week, Kamati had contacted the Namibian Broadcasting Corporation’s call-in radio programme, the Chat Show, to bring the plight of the children to the attention of the authorities and the public.In a vast and under-populated area suffering endemic poverty, Kaoko-Otavi is perhaps one of the most dependent schools as far as school feeding is concerned.Kamati said the teachers at the school and other schools in the area have been buying maize for the schoolchildren from local shops out of their own pockets.The Kaoko-Otavi day hostel, which houses and feeds children who live too far away to walk to school every day, houses 220 children at the moment, teachers at the school said.Some 6 000 children, who depend on the school feeding scheme for a regular meal during the week when they attend schools far away from their homes, have been left without any stocks.Teachers in the area complained that this was a regular occurrence at the beginning and end of every term, and that complaints to Windhoek appeared to fall on deaf ears.Several members of the public have offered food and cash after hearing of the shortage.Because of the remoteness of the area, Kamati has suggested that people wishing to make donations should deposit money into the account of the chairperson of the Kaoko-Otavi school board, Hilma Kauaria.Kauaria has made her account with First National Bank in Opuwo available for this purpose (Savings Account 605 4416 8227).”If people can help us, we can get other food than the protein blend.We know that we will get maize, but we do not know about the other stuff… but we can buy better food, if the people of Namibia can help us,” Kamati said.* John Grobler is a freelance journalist; 081 240 1587

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