Don’t Want, And Won’t Pay For NBC Licence

Don’t Want, And Won’t Pay For NBC Licence

IN reply to the letter from ‘Proud TV Licence Payer’ Ntelamo Ntelamo: As a Namibian taxpayer I already contribute to the continued existence of NBC, and, by extension, national development, through the support the national broadcaster receives from Government.

I would ask the letter writer, (and indeed would like any attorneys to tell me the legal position on this) why I should be compelled to pay for a service I neither want, nor am technically able to receive? If I don’t own a car, I wouldn’t expect to have to purchase a vehicle tax disc every year. If I decided only to use my cellphone to make phone calls, I wouldn’t expect Telecom Namibia to charge me rental for a landline I didn’t possess.And, most pertinent of all, even though I have a satellite disc on my roof, since I don’t have a contract to receive DSTV and so do not watch it, DSTV does not expect me to pay for the service.We all know that the possession of a TV monitor, in itself, doesn’t mean that we are necessarily going to watch NBC – they can be used for a growing number of other functions.Some computer monitors, too, can support television signal reception but I don’t imagine that NBC hopes to invade every office and home in the country to try to ascertain which computers to be found there could be employed for illicit television watching.My question is this.If NBC came to my house and insisted they be allowed entry to count my television monitors (would this even be legal itself?) then what would be my position if I could show that not one of these monitors receives the NBC signal, even the one that I have bought a licence for in order to ‘stay legal’? All of them are used to play computer games and watch videos and DVDs only, and I don’t even have a connection to a TV aerial in the rooms where the monitors are to be found.In short, I don’t receive the service NBC wants me to pay for, I don’t want the service, and I cannot think of any other circumstances where, this being the case, I would still be expected to pay for an unwanted and unavailable service regardless.Non-Viewer Via e-mailIf I decided only to use my cellphone to make phone calls, I wouldn’t expect Telecom Namibia to charge me rental for a landline I didn’t possess.And, most pertinent of all, even though I have a satellite disc on my roof, since I don’t have a contract to receive DSTV and so do not watch it, DSTV does not expect me to pay for the service.We all know that the possession of a TV monitor, in itself, doesn’t mean that we are necessarily going to watch NBC – they can be used for a growing number of other functions.Some computer monitors, too, can support television signal reception but I don’t imagine that NBC hopes to invade every office and home in the country to try to ascertain which computers to be found there could be employed for illicit television watching.My question is this.If NBC came to my house and insisted they be allowed entry to count my television monitors (would this even be legal itself?) then what would be my position if I could show that not one of these monitors receives the NBC signal, even the one that I have bought a licence for in order to ‘stay legal’? All of them are used to play computer games and watch videos and DVDs only, and I don’t even have a connection to a TV aerial in the rooms where the monitors are to be found.In short, I don’t receive the service NBC wants me to pay for, I don’t want the service, and I cannot think of any other circumstances where, this being the case, I would still be expected to pay for an unwanted and unavailable service regardless.Non-Viewer Via e-mail

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