Clinton and John Kerry join forces against Bush

Clinton and John Kerry join forces against Bush

WASHINGTON – Former President Bill Clinton and Sen.

John Kerry ganged up on President George W. Bush on the campaign trail on Monday, with Clinton warning Bush wants to scare voters and Kerry slamming Bush’s “incompetence” in not protecting tons of missing explosives in Iraq.Bush, with former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani at his side, criticised Democrat Kerry’s strategy of “pessimism and retreat” and told voters in Colorado that “in every critical respect, my opponent and I see the war on terror differently.”The potential balance of power on the Supreme Court moved front and centre with news that Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist was diagnosed with thyroid cancer and is in the hospital after undergoing a tracheotomy.Rehnquist, 80, the leader of the court’s conservative majority, is expected back on the bench next week.But his illness reminded voters a new president could be asked to fill several vacancies of retiring justices on the closely divided court.”We learned today that Justice Rehnquist is ill,” Kerry told black ministers in a conference call.”We know that two or three justices will be retiring in the next years.The Supreme Court is at stake.”With eight days left in a neck-and-neck race for the White House, both sides pulled out the big political guns in a final bid to energise base supporters and attract undecided swing voters in the last few toss-up battleground states.An enthusiastic and noticeably thinner Clinton, hitting the campaign trail seven weeks after heart bypass surgery, told thousands of cheering supporters in a downtown Philadelphia park that Bush was trying to scare them.”The other side, they are trying to scare the undecided voters about Senator Kerry and they are trying to scare the decided voters away from the polls,” Clinton said, adding “their plan is more of the same” on lost jobs, lost health-care benefits and rising budget deficits.”If one candidate is trying to scare you and the other is trying to get you to think, if one candidate is appealing to your fears and the other one is appealing to your hopes, you better vote for the one who wants you to think and hope,” he said.Kerry strategists hope Clinton can help energise Democratic base supporters, particularly black voters who will be crucial to pulling out a win in swing states like Pennsylvania, Ohio and Florida.Clinton headed to Florida after the Philadelphia rally for a solo appearance on Kerry’s behalf.”If this isn’t good for my heart, I don’t know what is,” Clinton told the raucous crowd.Bush, meanwhile, ratcheted up his criticism of Kerry’s approach to the war on terror during an appearance in Colorado and said Iraq was a key front in the war on terror.”The choice is not only between two candidates, it is between two directions in the conduct of the war on terror,” Bush said of the Nov.2 election.”Will America return to the defensive, reactive mind-set that sought to manage the dangers to our country? Or will we fight a real war with the goal of victory?” Giuliani, widely praised for his leadership in New York City after the Sept.11, 2001, attacks, told the crowd that Kerry “can’t seem to make up his mind whether terrorism is serious or a nuisance.”Bush mocked Kerry’s often-repeated line that Iraq was “the wrong war at the wrong place at the wrong time.””My opponent has the wrong strategy for the wrong country at the wrong time,” Bush told supporters in Greeley, Colorado.- Nampa-ReutersBush on the campaign trail on Monday, with Clinton warning Bush wants to scare voters and Kerry slamming Bush’s “incompetence” in not protecting tons of missing explosives in Iraq.Bush, with former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani at his side, criticised Democrat Kerry’s strategy of “pessimism and retreat” and told voters in Colorado that “in every critical respect, my opponent and I see the war on terror differently.”The potential balance of power on the Supreme Court moved front and centre with news that Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist was diagnosed with thyroid cancer and is in the hospital after undergoing a tracheotomy.Rehnquist, 80, the leader of the court’s conservative majority, is expected back on the bench next week.But his illness reminded voters a new president could be asked to fill several vacancies of retiring justices on the closely divided court.”We learned today that Justice Rehnquist is ill,” Kerry told black ministers in a conference call.”We know that two or three justices will be retiring in the next years.The Supreme Court is at stake.”With eight days left in a neck-and-neck race for the White House, both sides pulled out the big political guns in a final bid to energise base supporters and attract undecided swing voters in the last few toss-up battleground states.An enthusiastic and noticeably thinner Clinton, hitting the campaign trail seven weeks after heart bypass surgery, told thousands of cheering supporters in a downtown Philadelphia park that Bush was trying to scare them.”The other side, they are trying to scare the undecided voters about Senator Kerry and they are trying to scare the decided voters away from the polls,” Clinton said, adding “their plan is more of the same” on lost jobs, lost health-care benefits and rising budget deficits.”If one candidate is trying to scare you and the other is trying to get you to think, if one candidate is appealing to your fears and the other one is appealing to your hopes, you better vote for the one who wants you to think and hope,” he said.Kerry strategists hope Clinton can help energise Democratic base supporters, particularly black voters who will be crucial to pulling out a win in swing states like Pennsylvania, Ohio and Florida.Clinton headed to Florida after the Philadelphia rally for a solo appearance on Kerry’s behalf.”If this isn’t good for my heart, I don’t know what is,” Clinton told the raucous crowd.Bush, meanwhile, ratcheted up his criticism of Kerry’s approach to the war on terror during an appearance in Colorado and said Iraq was a key front in the war on terror.”The choice is not only between two candidates, it is between two directions in the conduct of the war on terror,” Bush said of the Nov.2 election.”Will America return to the defensive, reactive mind-set that sought to manage the dangers to our country? Or will we fight a real war with the goal of victory?” Giuliani, widely praised for his leadership in New York City after the Sept.11, 2001, attacks, told the crowd that Kerry “can’t seem to make up his mind whether terrorism is serious or a nuisance.”Bush mocked Kerry’s often-repeated line that Iraq was “the wrong war at the wrong place at the wrong time.””My opponent has the wrong strategy for the wrong country at the wrong time,” Bush told supporters in Greeley, Colorado.- Nampa-Reuters

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