Ban on Brazilian meat

Ban on Brazilian meat

INDONESIA and Switzerland have become the latest countries to ban the import of Brazilian meat, raising to 43 the number of countries that have restricted imports since an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease, the Brazilian government said this week.

Namibia banned Brazilian meat products – beef and pork – at the beginning of the month, after Brazil announced an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease. In an interview yesterday, Deputy Chief Veterinary Officer Cleopas Bamhare said the ban would be effective until Namibia was sure that Brazil had dealt with the problem.He however, said Namibia is still importing chickens from Brazil.Indonesia has banned imports of all Brazilian meat or meat products.The ban extended to soy meal, machinery and medication, the ministry said.The Brazilian Agriculture Ministry said it would appeal the decision to the World Trade Organisation because it affected imports of “products that have no relation to foot and mouth disease.”The ban on Brazilian meat imports also has been adopted by the 25-nation European Union, Russia, South Africa, Chile, Cuba, Israel, Bolivia, Singapore, Egypt, Mozambique, Namibia, Norway, Paraguay, Peru, the Ukraine and Uruguay.Financial losses to cattle raisers could reach 1 billion reals (US$450 million), Agriculture Minister Roberto Rodrigues said.Brazil confirmed five new cases of foot-and-mouth disease on Friday in the midwestern state of Mato Grosso do Sul, a major cattle producer that had reported other outbreaks earlier in the month.The Agriculture Ministry said the new outbreaks were under control, although it didn’t confirm reports of more cases in the neighbouring state of Parana.The ministry said 6 500 head of cattle would be sacrificed to contain the highly infectious disease.Rodrigues said he and other cabinet officials would visit the European Union and other countries to obtain a suspension of the embargoes as soon as possible.Brazil, with its estimated 190 million heads of cattle, has the largest cattle herd in the world.It exports 23 per cent of its beef, which was expected to earn US$3 billion (N$19,8 billion) this year.Some analysts say the foot-and-mouth outbreak could cost Brazil US$900 million in lost export revenue.-Nampa-AP, Own reporterIn an interview yesterday, Deputy Chief Veterinary Officer Cleopas Bamhare said the ban would be effective until Namibia was sure that Brazil had dealt with the problem.He however, said Namibia is still importing chickens from Brazil.Indonesia has banned imports of all Brazilian meat or meat products.The ban extended to soy meal, machinery and medication, the ministry said.The Brazilian Agriculture Ministry said it would appeal the decision to the World Trade Organisation because it affected imports of “products that have no relation to foot and mouth disease.”The ban on Brazilian meat imports also has been adopted by the 25-nation European Union, Russia, South Africa, Chile, Cuba, Israel, Bolivia, Singapore, Egypt, Mozambique, Namibia, Norway, Paraguay, Peru, the Ukraine and Uruguay.Financial losses to cattle raisers could reach 1 billion reals (US$450 million), Agriculture Minister Roberto Rodrigues said.Brazil confirmed five new cases of foot-and-mouth disease on Friday in the midwestern state of Mato Grosso do Sul, a major cattle producer that had reported other outbreaks earlier in the month.The Agriculture Ministry said the new outbreaks were under control, although it didn’t confirm reports of more cases in the neighbouring state of Parana.The ministry said 6 500 head of cattle would be sacrificed to contain the highly infectious disease.Rodrigues said he and other cabinet officials would visit the European Union and other countries to obtain a suspension of the embargoes as soon as possible.Brazil, with its estimated 190 million heads of cattle, has the largest cattle herd in the world.It exports 23 per cent of its beef, which was expected to earn US$3 billion (N$19,8 billion) this year.Some analysts say the foot-and-mouth outbreak could cost Brazil US$900 million in lost export revenue.-Nampa-AP, Own reporter

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