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The Namibian Home PageFri 22 May 2015, 20:05Last update: 22 May 2015
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The Namibian
Fri 22 May 2015
 IS the alcohol we drink in shebeens different from that in hotels and do the shebeens brew their own special beer? I personally thought we are all buying beer from Namibia Breweries Limited. I would thus like to tell some people that they should think dee
 THERE should be an issue of tribal discrimination involved in this whole Polytechnic fight. Now that the minister of higher education is from the same tribal group as the rector, he seems to be more comfortable to do as he pleases.
 MR President and Minister of Works and Transport, drive on the road from Oshakati to Ruacana and see the bad condition it is in. It is dangerous to drive on that road and our cars are getting damaged. Please make it a priority to fix it.
 WAITING to see what the new President will do to stop the rot at Polytechnic. Millions of dollars are unaccounted for. To clean up the place, Tjivikua, Gunzel and Jaftha must go.
 REGIONAL office of the Ministry of Health and Social Services, the staff in Opuwo should get their salaries on time. Stop delaying S&T and overtime payments as well.
POLL
Will divorcing teachers' colleges from Unam improve the education system?

1. No, it is a waste of money.

2. Yes, it will attract those with passion.

3. It doesn't matter. Students will enroll anyway.

4. Maybe, but they must raise the entry requirements.


Results so far:
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VACANCIES
  • No vacant positions

ECONOMIC NEWS | 2006-03-03
Sibinda flood victims evacuated
* LINDSAY DENTLINGER
THE Caprivi Regional Emergency Management unit yesterday began moving around 1 200 people from the flooded Sibinda constituency to drier ground.
At least 500 of the affected people are pupils at the local school,
where classrooms and teachers' houses have been flooded as a result
of heavy rains over the past two months.
Since the beginning of the year, the Caprivi has received more
than 400 mm of rain.

Councillor for the Sibinda constituency Felix Mukupe told The
Namibian yesterday that he expected all the affected people to be
moved by the end of the weekend.

They are being taken by car about two kilometres away from
Sibinda village, where they are being provided with tents, food and
blankets.

Teachers' houses were flooded by rainwater and they have been
forced to sleep together in a small room in the school hostel.

Houses in the area are usually made of mud and clay.

The Deputy Director of the Emergency Management Unit, Gabriel
Kangowa, was in the Caprivi this week to check on Remu operations
and contingency plans.

The Zambezi River surpassed the two-metre level this week, but
is still low compared to the average at this time of year and
levels that caused flooding in the eastern floodplains in 2003 and
2004.

"We are really monitoring the situation very closely.

This time we are better prepared.

We are going to work better," Kangowa told The Namibian from
Katima Mulilo.

He said people were already being prepared to evacuate the
moment the river level becomes a flood threat, instead of waiting
for the flood to arrive.

Warehouses at the town had been cleaned in preparation for
emergency supplies that had already been sent to the Caprivi last
week, he said.

This week Kangowa travelled to most of the areas that become
unreachable when the Zambezi River is in flood, and he said he had
not experienced any problems in getting there.

But he said it could not be ruled out that the situation could
change later this month or even next month.

"We are very carefully monitoring the river.

There is nothing threatening at the moment, but you never know
what can happen," said Acting Caprivi Governor Leonard Mwilima.




Since the beginning of the year, the Caprivi has received more than
400 mm of rain.Councillor for the Sibinda constituency Felix Mukupe
told The Namibian yesterday that he expected all the affected
people to be moved by the end of the weekend.They are being taken
by car about two kilometres away from Sibinda village, where they
are being provided with tents, food and blankets.Teachers' houses
were flooded by rainwater and they have been forced to sleep
together in a small room in the school hostel.Houses in the area
are usually made of mud and clay.The Deputy Director of the
Emergency Management Unit, Gabriel Kangowa, was in the Caprivi this
week to check on Remu operations and contingency plans.The Zambezi
River surpassed the two-metre level this week, but is still low
compared to the average at this time of year and levels that caused
flooding in the eastern floodplains in 2003 and 2004."We are really
monitoring the situation very closely.This time we are better
prepared.We are going to work better," Kangowa told The Namibian
from Katima Mulilo.He said people were already being prepared to
evacuate the moment the river level becomes a flood threat, instead
of waiting for the flood to arrive.Warehouses at the town had been
cleaned in preparation for emergency supplies that had already been
sent to the Caprivi last week, he said.This week Kangowa travelled
to most of the areas that become unreachable when the Zambezi River
is in flood, and he said he had not experienced any problems in
getting there.But he said it could not be ruled out that the
situation could change later this month or even next month."We are
very carefully monitoring the river.There is nothing threatening at
the moment, but you never know what can happen," said Acting
Caprivi Governor Leonard Mwilima.

         


IJG Daily Bulletin

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