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The Namibian
Fri 19 Dec 2014
 CREDIT to Ms Kauraisa from the Ministry of Education's human resources department. She is the best. Keep up the good work!
 WHO compiles the inflation rates? Everyday consumer prices go up, yet we are told everything is just fine and we should keep on being happy.
 MTC, we Namibians cannot afford to pay N$2 daily. Please, change your strategy. What Tim Ekandjo said on NBC TV is unacceptable.
 ECN, you are being unrealistic! You cannot just pay us N$2 900. We had to pay for own transport, accommodation and food. What will we do with N$2 900?
 GOBABIS municipality, please build a wall around the cemetery at Epako. That place is now a playground for children. Cars drive over some graves.
POLL
What are the biggest issues that Hage Geingob's administration would have to deal with?

1. Curbing corruption

2. Improving the quality of education and healthcare

3. Provide dignified housing for all

4. Create more jobs


Results so far:
 Older Polls


ECONOMIC NEWS | 2005-02-01
Iran did not buy uranium from Rössing, says Govt
CHRISTOF MALETSKY
THE Namibian Government says it was no secret that Iran has shares in Rössing Uranium Limited, but denies that Tehran purchased Namibian uranium.
The United States accuses Iran of secretly developing nuclear
weapons.
"They have shares. That is not a secret, just like the Namibian
Government is also a minority shareholder in Rössing," said
the Director of Mines Asser Mudhika.

He denied that any local uranium had been exported to Iran.

"That we can stand for it. We are working with the International
Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and they know the end destination of
our uranium," he said.

Reuters news agency reported over the weekend that the
government of Iran has held a 15 per cent shareholding in
Rössing Uranium Limited since 1975.

It quoted Graham Davidson, the General Manager for operations at
Rössing, as stating that the company's board of directors only
permits the sale of uranium for use in generating electricity.

Davidson said there were no contracts with Iran for the sale of
milled uranium oxide, better known as "yellowcake."

The company did not respond to a question whether Iran had
purchased any Rössing uranium in the past, while the spokesman
for IAEA declined to comment.

Mudhika, who represents the Government on the Rössing
board, said the Ministry of Mines monitors how uranium is exported
from Namibia and follows it through to its final destination.

Rössing Uranium Limited, which is majority owned by
Anglo-Australian firm Rio Tinto, sells its uranium to nuclear power
plants in the United States, Japan, South Korea and Sweden.

Davidson told Reuters last week that representatives of the
government of Iran routinely attend Rössing board
meetings.

US officials said they were not aware of Iran's stake in
Rössing and a senior Iranian official in Tehran declined to
comment when approached by Reuters.

An official at the US State Department said it did not appear
illegal for US power companies to buy uranium from a company partly
owned by Iran.

Rössing forwarded its response to the Reuters queries to
the Ministry of Mines and Energy on Saturday afternoon.

Davidson said the use of the mine's material is closely
monitored by the IAEA.

"They have shares. That is not a secret, just like the Namibian
Government is also a minority shareholder in Rössing," said
the Director of Mines Asser Mudhika.He denied that any local
uranium had been exported to Iran."That we can stand for it. We are
working with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and they
know the end destination of our uranium," he said.Reuters news
agency reported over the weekend that the government of Iran has
held a 15 per cent shareholding in Rössing Uranium Limited
since 1975.It quoted Graham Davidson, the General Manager for
operations at Rössing, as stating that the company's board of
directors only permits the sale of uranium for use in generating
electricity.Davidson said there were no contracts with Iran for the
sale of milled uranium oxide, better known as "yellowcake."The
company did not respond to a question whether Iran had purchased
any Rössing uranium in the past, while the spokesman for IAEA
declined to comment.Mudhika, who represents the Government on the
Rössing board, said the Ministry of Mines monitors how uranium
is exported from Namibia and follows it through to its final
destination.Rössing Uranium Limited, which is majority owned
by Anglo-Australian firm Rio Tinto, sells its uranium to nuclear
power plants in the United States, Japan, South Korea and
Sweden.Davidson told Reuters last week that representatives of the
government of Iran routinely attend Rössing board meetings.US
officials said they were not aware of Iran's stake in Rössing
and a senior Iranian official in Tehran declined to comment when
approached by Reuters.An official at the US State Department said
it did not appear illegal for US power companies to buy uranium
from a company partly owned by Iran.Rössing forwarded its
response to the Reuters queries to the Ministry of Mines and Energy
on Saturday afternoon.Davidson said the use of the mine's material
is closely monitored by the IAEA.

         


Electoral Commission of Namibia
IJG Daily Bulletin

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