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The Namibian
Mon 20 Oct 2014
 • IT seems when our government leaders make promises to the nation to build more schools, provide better medical facilities and create more jobs, etc, they delay those plans and at times brush them under the carpet that is lavishly laid out for them. But
 • SWAPO leaders, our Lord does not care much about the importance of your work as you are creating two Namibian countries. One is where your own children are assured of a better future while the other passes on poverty to the next generation.
 • HAPPY International White Cane Day! I would like to wish all visually impaired and those partially sighted a blessed day. Remember, even without sight there is vision. Let us keep on advocating our rights.
 • WHY does the government not appoint independent bodies to supervise tender boards? The tender boards are perceived to be corrupt and we don't know where to go. The relevant authorities must help us poor Namibians.
 • ONDANGWA Magistrate's Court, please familiarise yourself with court proceedings at other courts. Police officers are abusing people. One cannot even cross his or her legs or even lean against those hard chairs. Go to Windhoek or watch the Oscar Pistoriu
 • I, ELIFAS Shoombe Shaanika, lost a wallet with my personal documents in a taxi in Windhoek. If found, please contact me on 081 2167308 or 081 2984947.
POLL
Should presidential candidates have public debates before the elections?

1. Yes, it will help us make up our minds.

2. No, it will have no effect on the outcome.

3. Maybe, but will Swapo agree this time?

4. No one cares!


Results so far:
 Older Polls


ECONOMIC NEWS | 2005-02-01
Iran did not buy uranium from Rössing, says Govt
CHRISTOF MALETSKY
THE Namibian Government says it was no secret that Iran has shares in Rössing Uranium Limited, but denies that Tehran purchased Namibian uranium.
The United States accuses Iran of secretly developing nuclear
weapons.
"They have shares. That is not a secret, just like the Namibian
Government is also a minority shareholder in Rössing," said
the Director of Mines Asser Mudhika.

He denied that any local uranium had been exported to Iran.

"That we can stand for it. We are working with the International
Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and they know the end destination of
our uranium," he said.

Reuters news agency reported over the weekend that the
government of Iran has held a 15 per cent shareholding in
Rössing Uranium Limited since 1975.

It quoted Graham Davidson, the General Manager for operations at
Rössing, as stating that the company's board of directors only
permits the sale of uranium for use in generating electricity.

Davidson said there were no contracts with Iran for the sale of
milled uranium oxide, better known as "yellowcake."

The company did not respond to a question whether Iran had
purchased any Rössing uranium in the past, while the spokesman
for IAEA declined to comment.

Mudhika, who represents the Government on the Rössing
board, said the Ministry of Mines monitors how uranium is exported
from Namibia and follows it through to its final destination.

Rössing Uranium Limited, which is majority owned by
Anglo-Australian firm Rio Tinto, sells its uranium to nuclear power
plants in the United States, Japan, South Korea and Sweden.

Davidson told Reuters last week that representatives of the
government of Iran routinely attend Rössing board
meetings.

US officials said they were not aware of Iran's stake in
Rössing and a senior Iranian official in Tehran declined to
comment when approached by Reuters.

An official at the US State Department said it did not appear
illegal for US power companies to buy uranium from a company partly
owned by Iran.

Rössing forwarded its response to the Reuters queries to
the Ministry of Mines and Energy on Saturday afternoon.

Davidson said the use of the mine's material is closely
monitored by the IAEA.

"They have shares. That is not a secret, just like the Namibian
Government is also a minority shareholder in Rössing," said
the Director of Mines Asser Mudhika.He denied that any local
uranium had been exported to Iran."That we can stand for it. We are
working with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and they
know the end destination of our uranium," he said.Reuters news
agency reported over the weekend that the government of Iran has
held a 15 per cent shareholding in Rössing Uranium Limited
since 1975.It quoted Graham Davidson, the General Manager for
operations at Rössing, as stating that the company's board of
directors only permits the sale of uranium for use in generating
electricity.Davidson said there were no contracts with Iran for the
sale of milled uranium oxide, better known as "yellowcake."The
company did not respond to a question whether Iran had purchased
any Rössing uranium in the past, while the spokesman for IAEA
declined to comment.Mudhika, who represents the Government on the
Rössing board, said the Ministry of Mines monitors how uranium
is exported from Namibia and follows it through to its final
destination.Rössing Uranium Limited, which is majority owned
by Anglo-Australian firm Rio Tinto, sells its uranium to nuclear
power plants in the United States, Japan, South Korea and
Sweden.Davidson told Reuters last week that representatives of the
government of Iran routinely attend Rössing board meetings.US
officials said they were not aware of Iran's stake in Rössing
and a senior Iranian official in Tehran declined to comment when
approached by Reuters.An official at the US State Department said
it did not appear illegal for US power companies to buy uranium
from a company partly owned by Iran.Rössing forwarded its
response to the Reuters queries to the Ministry of Mines and Energy
on Saturday afternoon.Davidson said the use of the mine's material
is closely monitored by the IAEA.

         


Electoral Commission of Namibia
IJG Daily Bulletin

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