The NamibianThe WeekenderYouthPaperBack of the BookSupplements
[ Login ]   |   [ Register ]
The Namibian
  
 Breaking News:
  Ricardo Mannetti appointed Brave Warriors coach on 4-year contract   
The Namibian Home PageBreaking newsMon 3 Aug 2015, 18:10Last update: 3 Aug 2015
News    Opinions    Sport    Business    Entertainment    Oshiwambo    Archive    Top Revs    Letters    Vacancies   
News    Opinions    Sport    Business    Entertainment    Oshiwambo    Archive    Top Revs    Letters    Vacancies   

Rugby World Cup 2015
The Namibian
Mon 3 Aug 2015
 *MINISTRY of Education, let studying for a learners licence be a subject in Grade 8 and 9 if road safety really is a national concern.
 *CHECKERS, instead of charging people for the use of trolleys, why don't you charge us for every plastic bag? You could make more money and contribute towards potecting the environment.
 *I WANT to know why the ministry of trade is allowing fake products to be sold on the market by the Chinese people in Namibia.
 *WHAT is the meaning of Vision 2030? Minister Haufiku, there was only one functional X-ray machine at Katutura Intermediate Hospital for the whole Khomas region. Now it is out of order.
POLL
Has government dealt with the housing crisis appropriately?

1. No, not at all

2. They are trying their best

3. All talk, no action

4. Yes, through NHE & mass housing


Results so far:
 Older Polls

VACANCIES
  • No vacant positions

FRONT PAGE | 2012-10-31
Homeless people becoming a familiar feature of town life
CLEMANS MIYANICWE
AFTER 22 years of independence many Namibians still sleep on the streets because they have no shelter.
Unused government buildings, abandoned houses, public parks and under bridges are where Namibia's homeless find refuge to escape the harsh and cold realities of the night.
The Namibian this week did a snap street survey and spoke to a number of homeless people in Windhoek.
Denver Jacobs is a 49-year-old man has not had a fixed place of living for half of his life.
'I am living almost everywhere I can sleep. Government is doing nothing for its citizens,' Jacobs told The Namibian from where had spent the night on a little mattress spread on the floor near Pick n Pay in Khomasdal.
'Government can build us a hostel were we can at least sleep. Fat cats are doing nothing, just stealing money.'
Jacob is the father of three children - twins living in Cape Town and another in Namaqualand in South Africa with their mothers' relatives.
Jacobs said he does not see a reason for voting as the government has failed its citizens after 22 years of freedom.
Jacob has not had a proper meal in three weeks.
With Jacobs was another 49-year-old, who was once a police constable for eight years in Windhoek. According to Jacobs some social workers visit them every two months and provided them with food.
Dennis van Wyk is 40 years old and was also a policeman before he resigned in 2003 and started a taxi business, which did not last.
Van Wyk's family home was sold after his mother died and and proceeds were divided among the siblings.
'Life is hard on the streets in Windhoek. I came to stay with Jacobs three weeks ago at this place,' said Van Wyk, who was holding a Bible.
'I read the Bible to find comfort as there are a lot of problems we homeless people face,' Van Wyk said sitting on top of a crate, under which his meagre worldly belongings are stored.
'This is my picture when I was a constable. I will go back to the police force to serve my nation again if the opportunity arises,' said Van Wyk.
Under a tree near the Inner City Evangelical Lutheran Church in Windhoek stays 29-year-old Saliste Araes, who has been homeless for the past five years. Araes has all her belongings packed in a shopping trolley.
'I sleep, dress up here, and it's my home,' said Araes, who is originally from Rehoboth. 'I don't know where I will get my next meal from.'
As the rain fell softly yesterday morning, Araes covered herself with plastic to keep her blanket dry.
At the Van Rhijnhof building in Windhoek West, about 15 homeless people live.
'I stay here and once I wake up I go to hustle around to get something to eat,' Johannes Jacob, who hails from the South, told The Namibian.
The 28-year-old Keetmanshoop-born Jacobs looks three times his real age from the hard knocks of life.
Efforts to get comment from the Ministry of Labour and Social Welfare and the Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare proved futile as The Namibian was sent from pillar to post for the right person to comment on the issue.

         



IJG Daily Bulletin

A product of CEIT Development Namibia